Why Trust a Theory? Reconsidering Scientific Methodology in Light of Modern Physics
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Peter Achinstein is Professor for Philosophy at the Johns Hopkins University. One focal point of his research is the role of evidence in science. He has written a number of influential books on the topic, including The Book of Evidence (2001) and Evidence and Method: Scientific Strategies of Isaac Newton and James Clerk Maxwell (2013). He is the winner of the Lakatos Price 1993 for his book Particles and Waves. For more information visit his website.

Elena Castellani is a philosopher of science at the University of Florence. Her work focuses on the philosophy of physics, in particular on the philosophical aspects of symmetries in physics and on the philosophy of string theory. She is a co-editor of the book The Birth of String Theory (2012). For more information visit her website.

Radin Dardashti is a doctoral fellow at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy. His research interests focus on the philosophy of science and the philosophy of physics. They include scientific methodology in the absence of empirical data, the role of symmetries in quantum field theory, and the use of non-classical probability spaces in quantum mechanics. For more information visit his website.

Richard Dawid is a philosopher of science at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy/LMU Munich. The focus of his research lies on epistemic questions in fundamental physics and the general philosophy of science. He is the author of the book String Theory and the Scientific Method (2013) on the question of non-empirical theory confirmation in fundamental physics. For more information visit his website.

Gia Dvali is Professor for theoretical physics and Humboldt professor at the LMU Munich. He is also a director at the Max-Planck-Institute for physics in Munich and Silver professor at New York university. He has made important contributions to high energy physics and astroparticle physics and is one of the creators of the concept of large extra dimensions in high energy physics. For more information visit his website.

George Ellis is emeritus Distinguished Professor of complex Systems at the University of Cape Town. He is the winner of the Templeton Prize 2004. He made important contributions to cosmology, in particular on anisotropic cosmologies and inhomogeneous universes . With Stephen Hawking, he co-authored the book The Large Scale Structure of Space Time. For more information visit his website.

David Gross is Professor for theoretical physics at UC Santa Barbara and holder of the Frederick W. Gluck chair at the Kvali Institute. He was awarded the Nobel prize in physics in 2004 for his joint discovery of the asymptotic freedom of the strong interactions. He is one of the pioneers of string theory. Foremost among his contributions to string theory is the formulation of the heterotic string. For more information visit his website.

Sabine Hossenfelder is a physicist working at the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics in Stockholm. Her main research interest is quantum gravity and, more recently, strong-weak dualities in condensed matter systems. For more information visit her website.

Gordon Kane is Victor Weisskopf Distinguished University Professor of physics at the University of Michigan. He made important contributions to Higgs physics and supersymmetric phenomenology. He was one of the developers of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. Recently, he has made influential contributions to string phenomenology including M-theory compactification and LHC predictions. For more information visit his website.

Helge Kragh is Emeritus Professor at the Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, and former Professor of the History of Science at Aarhus University. His work focuses on the history of physics and cosmology as well as chemistry. He is the author of a number of books, including Dirac, a Scientific Biography and Higher Speculations and Grand Theories and Failed Revolutions in Physics and Cosmology. For more information visit his website.

Dieter Lüst is Professor for theoretical physics at the LMU Munich and a director of the Max Planck Intsitute for Physics in Munich. His research focusses on string theory. Among his important contributions to the field are works on string compactification, brane physics, gravity and black holes.

Viatcheslav Mukhanov is Professor for theoretical physics at the LMU Munich. He is the winner of the Gruber Prize 2013. He made important contributions to inflationary cosmology, developed the theory of the quantum origin of the universe structure and successfully predicted the inhomogeneities of the cosmic microwave background. For more information visit his website.

Massimo Pigliucci is K. D. Irani Professor of Philosophy at the City College of New York. He works on the structure and foundations of evolutionary theory, the relationship between science and philosophy and the problem of demarcating science from non-science. He is co-editor of the book Philosophy of Pseudoscience – reconsidering the Demarcation Problem. For more information visit his website.

Joseph Polchinski is Professor of physics at the UC Santa Barbara and the Kvali Institute. He is the winner of the Physics Frontiers Prize 2013 and 2014. Most important among his many contributions to high energy physics and string theory is a modern formulation of renormalization theory, the discovery of D-branes and work on the string landscape and black hole physics. He is the author of the seminal two volume textbook String Theory (1999). For more information visit his website.

Fernando Quevedo is Professor of Theoretical Physics at the University of Cambridge and the director of the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physic (ICTP) in Trieste. He has made important contributions to high energy physics model building and string theory. A focus of his research is the analysis of the phenomenological and cosmological import of string theory. For more information visit his website.

Carlo Rovelli is Professor for theoretical physics at the university of Aix Marseilles, France. He is one of the founders and leading exponents of loop quantum gravity. He has also made important contributions to the foundational debate in quantum mechanics. He is the author of the book Quantum Gravity (2004) and co-author of Covariant Loop Quantum Gravity (2015). For more information visit his website.

Björn Malte Schäfer works at Heidelberg University on problems related to cosmology, cosmic structure formation, development of statistical methods and on the relation between cosmology and astrophysics. The focus of his work are tests of gravitational theories through weak gravitational lensing and anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background. For more information visit his website.

Joseph Silk is Homewood Professor of Physics and astronomy at Johns Hopkins University, Maryland and the Universite Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris. He works on galaxy formation and cosmology and made important contributions to the understanding of the cosmic microwave background. He is author of the book The Infinite Cosmos (2006). For more information visit his website.

Chris Smeenk is a philosopher of science at Western University in London, Ontario, and is a member of the Rotman Institute of Philosophy. He isinterested in the philosophy of physics and general issues in the philosophy of science. A main focus of his research is the philosophy of cosmology. For more information visit his website.

Karim Thébault is a philosopher of science at the University of Bristol. He is interested in the philosophy of physics and central issues in the general philosophy of science. His research focusses on the foundations of quantization, the problem of time in quantum gravity, and analogue gravity. For more information visit his website.

Chris Wüthrich is a philosopher of science at the University of Geneva. His philosophical interests include foundational issues in physics, particularly in classical general relativity and quantum gravity as well as the implications of philosophy of physics for general philosophy of science and metaphysics. For more information visit his website.